Study shows potential of subcutaneous injection Ocrevus as treatment option for relapsing, progressive MS

April 23, 2024
A new study showed that treatment with Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) subcutaneous injections resulted in near-complete suppression of clinical relapses and brain lesions in people with relapsing or primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Treatment with the Ocrevus SC injection led to rapid and sustained B-cell depletion in the blood.

Updated, longer-term results showed that Ocrevus SC injection resulted in near-complete suppression of relapse activity (97.2 percent had no relapse during the treatment phase) and MRI up to 48 weeks with an annualized relapse rate of .04, and most patients having no T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions and no new or enlarging T2 lesions. These lesion types are markers of active inflammation and burden of disease, respectively. Additionally, patients reported a high level of satisfaction and convenience with Ocrevus SC injection.

Researchers said the updated results from the Phase III study of OCARINA II further underline the potential benefits of subcutaneous Ocrevus for patients with both relapsing and progressive forms of MS. Patients treated with subcutaneous Ocrevus experienced appropriate B-cell suppression and near-complete suppression of new inflammatory disease activity. These results demonstrate the potential of subcutaneous Ocrevus as a treatment option that can be matched to the individual needs of people with MS and healthcare professionals.

Additional data showed the safety profile of Ocrevus SC injection was consistent with the well-established safety profile of Ocrevus IV infusion. No new safety signals were identified for Ocrevus SC. The most common adverse events in the Ocrevus SC group were injection reactions, including erythema, pain, swelling, and itching skin – all of which were either mild or moderate and none of which led to treatment withdrawal. A total of seven serious adverse events were experienced by three and four patients in the Ocrevus SC injection and IV infusion groups, respectively.

The findings were presented at the 76th American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in Denver.

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