Eating fish may be tied to a reduced risk of MS

March 06, 2018
Eating fish one to three times per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements may be associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis. These findings suggest that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish may be associated with lowering the risk of developing MS.

For this study, researchers examined the diets of 1,153 people with an average age of 36 from a variety of backgrounds, about half of whom had been diagnosed with MS or clinically isolated syndrome. Participants were asked how much fish they regularly ate. High fish intake was defined as either eating one serving of fish per week, or eating one to three servings per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements. Low intake was defined as less than one serving of fish per month and no fish oil supplements.

The study found that high fish intake was associated with a 45 percent reduced risk of MS or clinically isolated syndrome when compared with those who ate fish less than once a month and did not take fish oil supplements. A total of 180 of those with MS had high fish intake compared to 251 of the healthy controls.

The study also looked at 13 genetic variations in a human gene cluster that regulates fatty acid levels. Researchers found two of the 13 genetic variations examined were linked to a lower risk of MS, even after accounting for the higher fish intake. This may mean that some people may have a genetic advantage when it comes to regulating fatty acid levels.

While the study suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, and how they are processed by the body, may play an important role in reducing MS risk, the study’s author said the findings simply show an association and not cause and effect. More research is needed to confirm the findings and to examine how omega-3 fatty acids may affect inflammation, metabolism and nerve function. 

Fish such as salmon, sardines, lake trout and albacore tuna are generally recommended as good sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Other vegetarian sources include chia seeds and walnuts.

The study was released online and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles.

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