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Be your own healthcare advocate

By: Cherie C. BinnsWe are often told that we need to advocate for ourselves when it comes to our healthcare. What does that mean and how do we go about that? There are a number of factors involved in advocating for yourself. Knowledge of your body, your response to medications, diet, exercise, stress are all key in being a believable and adequate self-advocate.
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A SLP and MS patient success story

By: Matt CavalloTo expand on how SLPs can help people living with MS, I wanted to share a personal story of how a SLP helped me recover from my cervical fusion.
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8 Great Reasons for Keeping Up with Your Dental Care

By: Gay FalkowskiWhen you’ve got a whole lot of MS symptoms to manage, it can be difficult to keep up with everyday good hygiene routines such as brushing your teeth and flossing. Here are just some of the reasons good oral hygiene habits and regular visits to the dentist should be an essential part of your overall healthcare plan.
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Speech Language Pathology and MS

By: Matt CavalloSpeech-language pathologists work to prevent, assess, diagnose, and treat speech, language, social communication, cognitive-communication, and swallowing disorders in children and adults. Speech problems, cognitive issues and swallowing disorders are all common with MS. However, most of us living with the disease don’t know the benefits to working with a SLP. Let’s look at the different ways in which speech disorders can affect a person living with MS and how SLPs can help.
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6 Ways to Change the Focus

By: Gay FalkowskiAfter an MS diagnosis, it’s common to be focused primarily on finding an effective treatment therapy and learning to manage symptoms. This process can require lots of time and attention as you try to discover what works best for you. However, over time, a wider focus may be needed to encompass all the changes MS can bring. On the brighter side, focusing on other aspects of your life may help you find new ways to improve your quality of life. Here are some areas to consider when you’re ready to change the focus.
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MS and Tai Chi

By: Matt CavalloTai chi, an ancient Chinese tradition that was originally a form of self-defense, has been transformed into a form of exercise that is considered good for people of all ages and fitness levels. Tai Chi is a series of slow movements combined with deep breathing. If you have MS and have tried yoga, but struggle to hold some of the poses, then you may want to try Tai Chi.
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30 Ways to be Visible

By: Gay FalkowskiYour MS can be invisible to others – even the worst symptoms can’t always be seen – but its effect on your life doesn’t have to be invisible too. When you say or do things that bring attention to the disease, and especially how it affects you, MS awareness grows. Here are 30 different ways to “be visible” all year long.
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MS, Depression and mental health professionals

By: Matt CavalloI wanted to learn more about medical professionals who treat depression. Physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners are trained to identify depression in their patients, and in some cases, treat it. However, once a person is identified as suffering from a possible depressive disorder they are often referred to a medical professional who specializes in mental illness.
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4 Dietary Changes that May Help Relieve Some of Your MS Symptoms

By: Gay FalkowskiThroughout the years, many special diets have been proposed as a way to treat and, in some cases, cure multiple sclerosis. None of the claims associated with these diets have been scientifically proven, though research on the relationship between food and MS continues. In the meantime, many MS experts advise those with MS to follow a low-fat, high-fiber diet similar to the one recommended by the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association. Here are four healthy dietary changes you may want to consider on your journey to better living with MS.
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MS and Hearing Problems

By: Matt CavalloDo you have multiple sclerosis and suffer from hearing problems? While not as common as symptoms like numbness, tingling, blurry vision and difficulties walking, hearing problems have been reported by people living with MS.
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Emotions and MS: 5 Ways to Develop Resilience

By: Gay FalkowskiJust as multiple sclerosis affects the physical health of each person in different ways, it also affects the emotional health of each person in different ways. Sadness, fear, happiness, anger, anxiety, contentment – all of these and more are feelings you may experience while living with MS. It is important to realize emotions are neither “right” nor “wrong,” and there is no “right” way to feel while coping with all the uncertainty – and the changes – that follow an MS diagnosis.
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MS and Breathing Problems

By: Matt CavalloDo you have multiple sclerosis and suffer from breathing problems? While it is not as common as symptoms like numbness, tingling, blurry vision and difficulties walking, breathing problems do occur with people living with MS. What do you do if you are experiencing breathing problems? Here are five strategies to help manage overall lung function with MS.
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3 Topics to Discuss with the Gynecologist on your Healthcare Team

By: Gay FalkowskiIf you are a woman with multiple sclerosis, a gynecologist is an essential member of your healthcare team, one who can address preventative care as well as female health issues affected by MS. Your healthcare needs related to gynecology will differ depending on your stage of life and how MS has affected you, but discussing the following topics with your gynecologist will help you better understand how to stay your healthiest and the options available to treat complications related to MS.
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Streamline Your Daily Activities with MS

By: Matt CavalloMultiple sclerosis has been compared to an iceberg because 90 percent of the disease activity may be hiding under the surface and not visible to the naked eye. This is especially true with cognition and fatigue. If your energy levels are low or your memory becomes foggy, doing even simple daily chores and activities can be more challenging. Here are five tips to keep you on track without feeling overwhelmed.
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Decluttering Your Life with MS

By: Matt CavalloIf you are living with multiple sclerosis like me, that extra stuff in your life that you are holding on to can create both physical and mental barriers. Physical barriers in terms of navigating around your living space and mental barriers in terms of organization, memory, and learning to let go.
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7 Myths and 7 Truths about Psychotherapy

By: Gay FalkowskiWhile depression can be treated by medication alone, research has shown that a combination of medication and psychotherapy is often the most effective approach to treatment. A trained professional can work with you to get rid of the negative thoughts and beliefs that may contribute to your depression and guide you to more healthy ways of thinking. Don’t let misconceptions about psychotherapy keep you from following through with doctor’s orders. Here are seven common myths, along with seven truths.
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Coping with the ‘winter blues’ when you have MS

By: Samantha Domingo and Amy MB SullivanThe winter season can mean relief for some people with MS who are highly affected by heat in the warmer months; for others, it can mean facing the dreaded ‘winter blues.’ As the days get shorter, people may find themselves feeling sad – usually these feelings resolve as the seasons change. However, for others these feelings can turn into seasonal depression, also referred to as Seasonal Affective Disorder.
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Five Health Insurance Processes and Protocols to know

By: Matt CavalloIn addition to the financial terms, you must also follow the processes and protocols determined by the terms of your health insurance plan. These processes and protocols include what is covered by the plan and how to go about ensuring the plan will cover what is prescribed. If you follow the process and protocols, then you are more likely to ensure that the health service rendered to you is covered by the plan. Here are the five health insurance processes and protocols you must know.
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12 Ingredients for a Gratitude Cornucopia

By: Gay FalkowskiNearly 400 years after colonists gathered to give thanks for a good harvest and for surviving their first year in the New World, we’ve learned that giving thanks is not just good for the community; it’s also good for the brain and body. Here are a dozen ways to exercise your gratitude.
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Five financial health insurance terms to know

By: Matt CavalloWhen evaluating a plan to determine which one best meets your needs, it is imperative to understand all of the different health insurance terms and what they mean to you. Health insurance is a complicated necessity that most of us don’t fully understand. As a person living with a chronic illness, purchasing health insurance is one of the most important decisions that you can make, so make sure you understand what you are buying.
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12 Reasons you Should Seek Treatment for Depression

By: Gay FalkowskiIf you’re managing a lot of different MS symptoms, feelings of depression can easily be overlooked. You may believe you are just tired or understandably sad to be living with a chronic illness. If so, you may not speak to anyone about what you’re feeling, hoping the blues will just fade away. They won’t, not if what you are experiencing is clinical depression. To be sure and to receive a proper diagnosis, visit a qualified mental health professional, ideally one who understands the particular challenges MS brings. Here are a dozen good reasons to seek help if you think you might be depressed.
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Managing MS as a Team

By: Matt CavalloLiving with MS is a lifelong commitment and you don’t have to fight it alone. There are many people on your life that can be valuable members of your team to help you battle the disease. It is important that you learn, however, how to effectively and opening communicate in order to get the support that you need from each person.
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Five ways to embrace the change of seasons with MS

By: Matt CavalloFor those of us living with MS, there is a season to capitalize on change and that time is now. As the calendar turns from summer to fall, those of us with MS welcome the cooler temperatures. The heat and humidity of summer have passed and hopefully, so have the pseudo-exacerbations (brief flare-ups) associated with the summer heat. Embracing change means being prepared for it, as well. The following are strategies to help you make the most of the change of seasons.
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Seven Reasons to Visit an MS Center

By: Gay FalkowskiWhether you are a newly diagnosed person with MS or someone searching for more specialized treatment of your MS, an MS Center can be a valuable resource in meeting your needs. Since its inception in 1986, the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) has grown rapidly. There are now more than 200 member centers in the United States, Canada, and Europe representing more than 4,000 health care professionals worldwide who provide care for more than 150,000 individuals with MS. Here are seven good reasons to visit.
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5 habits of highly effective MS caregivers

By: Gay FalkowskiWhile caring for someone with MS can be deeply rewarding, it can also be difficult because the disease is unpredictable. As a result, caregiving needs are continually shifting. Those who most easily adapt have developed habits that keep them grounded even in turbulent times. Here are five habits of highly effective MS caregivers.
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MS and your Circadian Rhythm

By: Matt CavalloWe all have a natural sleep cycle called our circadian rhythm. This helps tell us when it is time to sleep and when to be awake. If you are living with MS, sleep is a priority. Lack of sleep can lead to fatigue, brain fog and other MS symptoms. To train your circadian rhythm, you can establish a sleep schedule by going to bed at a consistent time, making sleep a priority, staying disciplined to that schedule, turning out lights and other distractions and taking advantage of the light of day. By getting on a sleep schedule, you will find harmony with your circadian rhythm.
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MS and Sleep Disorders

By: Matt CavalloOne of the common themes among the patients that I have talked to is sleep disorders. Many say that the chronic fatigue they experience with MS leads to problems with sleep. They also mention that they have trouble staying awake during the day, but are wide awake at night. This interruption of sleep cycle is can greatly affect all areas of a person’s life. In this article, we will explore the relationship between MS and sleep disorders.
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6 Reasons You Don't Exercise and What to Do About Them

By: Gay FalkowskiExcuses, excuses – we've all made them at some point in our lives, especially when exercise is what we're trying to avoid. But sometimes those excuses become beliefs that we need to challenge in order to do what's best for us. So, here are six common reasons for not exercising, along with solutions to overcoming those barriers.
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Neurologist and Specialists of MS

By: Matt CavalloRecently we looked at the early signs and symptoms of MS. The question now becomes, “Who should I talk to about my signs and symptoms?” Let’s look at the different specialists that may be involved in the diagnosis and care of someone living with multiple sclerosis.
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Early Signs and Symptoms of MS

By: Matt CavalloMultiple sclerosis is unique in that the signs and symptoms are unpredictable and can affect each person in a different way. According to the research, most people will experience the initial onset of their MS symptoms in their 20s to 50s. The same research reveals that of the 2.3 million people in the world diagnosed with MS, 66 percent are women. While MS affects each person in a different way, there are certain common symptoms that are associated with the early onset of the disease.
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iConquerMS provides patient powered research

By: Laura KolaczkowskiThe purpose of iConquerMS is to guide research that is meaningful and effective to people affected by MS. Through the online portal we can submit our own thoughts and research ideas. Has a researcher ever asked you what you want to have looked at in depth? Me neither! iConquerMS gives us the opportunity to change that and ask questions important to us.
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10 Evidence-Based Dietary Tips for Disease Prevention

By: Gay FalkowskiKnowing what to eat when you have MS can be downright confusing. After all, the jury is still out on dietary protocols aimed at delaying MS progression or reversing its effects. Yet, anecdotal "evidence" abounds on the Internet. So, what should you put on your plate? Foods that fill your nutritional needs and lower your risk of serious complications. Credible research has established which foods can help you be nutritionally fit and which foods can harm you, whether you have MS or not. To help you get started, here are 10 evidence-based dietary tips for disease prevention.
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7 Important Steps to Taking Medication Safely

By: Dr. Carolyn B. JasikMedications can easily be overlooked in the reality of everyday life. From remembering every dose to picking up refills, even simple prescription instructions aren’t the easiest to follow. But taking shortcuts can mean compromises to your health and safety. To make sure your medication is as effective as possible, here are the seven important rules to live by.
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Vacation Tips for Caregivers

By: Matt CavalloCaregivers are unsung heroes. The sacrifice the caregiver makes for a loved one living with MS is substantial. Caregiving is a full-time job without vacation benefits. However, time off from caregiving can be an important benefit for both the caregiver and the MS patient. Here are some tips on how to get caregivers the vacation they deserve.
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Conserving Energy with MS

By: Matt CavalloNearly 80 percent of the people living with MS experience fatigue. Fatigue is an overwhelming sense of tiredness that can be debilitating to those of us with MS. For me personally, fatigue is the most difficult symptom to convey to my family and friends because it is an invisible symptom. If you are losing the battle to MS fatigue, here are some tips to conserve your energy so that you can participate in activities you’ve been avoiding.
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Author, neurologist has a ‘gut’ reaction to MS

By: Marilyn Murray WillisonDr. David Perlmutter is a neurologist and a fellow of the American College of Nutrition. He is also the recipient of the Linus Pauling Award, and the author of two number one New York Times best-selling books. Marilyn Murray Willison spoke with Dr. Perlmutter and asked him to discuss his recent findings with the readers of the MSFocus.
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Physical Therapy and MS

By: Matt CavalloPhysical therapy is the treatment of an injury, disease, or other deformity through physical interventions including exercise, heat, ice, or massage. Physical therapy is performed by licensed physical therapists. According to the APTA, PTs are highly-educated, licensed health care professionals who can help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility.
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MS and Walking Difficulties

By: Matt CavalloIf you have multiple sclerosis and have difficulties walking, then you are not alone. Difficulty in walking, also referred to as gait disorders, is one of the more common symptoms reported among people with MS. A 2011 study on MS and walking found that 41 percent of people living with MS had difficulties walking. Another interesting correlation uncovered by the study found that only 34 percent of the people living with MS that had walking difficulties were employed. One could deduce from the study that walking has a profound effect on the quality of life of those living with MS.
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20 Things People say that are Wrong about MS – and 20 Things that are Right

By: Gay FalkowskiWhether you’ve had MS for a few months or many years, there’s a good chance you’ve gotten some pretty bad advice from people who just don’t have a clue. Everybody’s an expert, right? Negativity can be a real drag when you’re trying your hardest to overcome MS. So, we’ve taken 20 of the most common myths you’re likely to hear after diagnosis and then we’ve set the record straight. Share to make others aware!
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9 Strategies to Deal with Cognition Problems

By: Gay FalkowskiIt’s estimated that anywhere from 40 to 60 percent of people with MS develop some type of cognitive problem. Dealing with changes in memory and thought processing isn’t always easy, but minimizing the effects when possible can go a long way in improving quality of life. What follows are nine strategies to help manage various cognitive problems, three from each author who specializes in MS. And don’t forget to talk with the physician treating your MS so they can advise you of their recommendations, too.
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5 Fatigue Fighters

By: Gay FalkowskiFatigue is one of the most common symptoms of MS and one of the most debilitating, negatively affecting quality of life in a number of ways. That's why it's important to talk with your physician about combating fatigue and preserving energy. The first step usually involves ruling out causes such as depression or medication side effects. To boost energy, some physicians prescribe medication, such as Provigil. However, nonpharmaceutical strategies can be effective as well in keeping the lid on fatigue. Here are five of them.
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Screening Key to Catching Cognitive Dysfunction

By: Matthew Carraro M.D. and Aaron Boster M.D.MS is well known to cause impairment of strength, sensation, walking, bladder, bowel, and visual functions. Until recently, cognitive dysfunction was under-recognized in MS. Many recent advances have led us to better understand the vital importance of cognitive dysfunction, and the growing need to identify, measure, and treat it.
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Adaptive Exercises and MS

By: Matt CavalloOnce therapy ends how do you maintain the progress that you made during therapy? All therapy disciplines will provide you with a detailed home exercise program that has pictures and instructions for continuing your personalized plan of care. They may even provide you with adaptive equipment so that you can continue to manage your condition independently at home. Once you get to a point where you are feeling better and want to continue working on strength and conditioning, here are some exercise activities that you can do without the aid of a therapist.
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Utilizing Rehabilitation Professionals in Recovery of an MS Relapse

By: Matt CavalloWhile rehab professionals are a part of an overall wellness plan, it is often contingent upon the patient asking for a referral while at the neurologist office. Remember, the neurologist should manage your MS and would be happy to write you a referral for a therapy evaluation. If you are like me, and are experiencing a MS relapse that is affecting your overall quality of life, look into the benefits of working with a therapist that can help you work to regain your independence.
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Children Adapt to Mother’s MS Diagnosis

By: Shelley Peterman SchwarzIf you are like me, you worry how your MS will affect your children. I was diagnosed with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis 35 years ago. Dave, my husband and I had been married for 10 years; our daughter, Jamie was 5 and our son, Andrew was 3. Being a good and responsible parent is difficult and when you add MS, along with increasing disability, parenting is excruciating more difficult and complicated.
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5 Unknown Symptoms Associated with MS

By: Marissa A. BarreraMost individuals with MS are accustomed to experiencing fatigue, difficulty with mobility, and numbness. However, there are other symptoms that are less common. Because MS symptoms are variable and highly unpredictable, each person’s symptoms can change or vary over time. Here are some important but less obvious signs and symptoms of MS.
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Tips for Making the Most of Spring with MS

By: Matt CavalloIf you look out the window in some parts of the U.S., you might not know it but spring has arrived. It begs the question: Do April snow showers bring May flowers? Spring is the season that those of us with MS must take advantage of because before we know it, the dreaded dog days of summer will be here. Here are some tips for making the most of spring with MS.
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How Health Insurance Led Me into a MS Relapse

By: Matt CavalloAlthough my situation with insurance may be rare, it is important to realize that mistakes do happen often whether it is through coding, billing or preauthorization. Your health insurance has a direct effect on your quality of healthcare. Educate yourself on your plan and your rights and above all else, become your own advocate to ensure that you are getting the health care that you need.
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8 CAM Cautions

By: Gay FalkowskiWhether you are using complementary and alternative medicine as your prime MS treatment, or combining it with conventional medicine (the recommended approach), take heed: Just because a product is natural doesn’t mean it’s safe for your particular condition. Supplements may aggravate your symptoms and/or interact with prescription medications, including your MS disease-modifying therapy. That’s why it’s very important to talk to your physician before trying any type of CAM.
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5 Reasons a Second Opinion is Important for Your Health

By: Luanna BanghartThere is no complete and precise tool to diagnose multiple sclerosis. This determination by your doctor regarding multiple sclerosis is made by ruling out other diseases, a history of your symptoms and a brain scan that is not 100 percent accurate.
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7 Ways to Bloom Where You’re Planted

By: Gay FalkowskiSpring is here. As landscapes turn green again, we can’t help but take a hint from Mother Nature: It’s time to grow! For some people with MS, it’s overwhelming to think of doing anything new for the sake of personal growth. But you don’t have to run a marathon or climb a mountain in order to grow. In fact, you don’t even have to leave the house. Here are 7 low-cost activities you can do at home to get you growing
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An Optic Neuritis Relapse

By: Matt CavalloThis is the true story of what happened to me in February 2006. I wanted to share this with you today to bring awareness to what it is like to live through an MS relapse.
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Five Tips to Manage MS Beyond the Neurologist Office

By: Matt CavalloMarch is National MS Education and Awareness Month®. For those of us living with MS, we know that it is a chronic condition that must be managed beyond your yearly visits to the neurologist’s office. The challenge is maintaining the discipline that it takes to manage the condition in good times and in bad. Here are five tips that I use to try to manage my MS beyond the neurologist’s office.
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12 Steps to Help You ‘Think You Can’

By: Gay FalkowskiIf you have MS and follow research findings about what helps manage the disease, you might have heard about self-efficacy. In a study from Washington State University, people with MS with higher self-efficacy scores reported better overall health as well as less pain interference, fatigue, depression, perceived stress, and interference with participation in valued activities. So what is self-efficacy?
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10 Things That Someone with a Chronic Illness Might Like to Hear

By: Gay FalkowskiAs a person living with MS, you’ve likely got a long list of things that well-meaning friends and family have said to you that you’d like to never hear again — such as the dreaded “But you don’t look sick.” You know what you don’t want to hear, but have you thought about what you do want people to say to you? Here are 10 suggestions from others who have a chronic illness.
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Four ways to rekindle relationships with MS

By: Matt CavalloGoing through a diagnosis like MS may put a strain on your relationships. You may find yourself pushing people away. That doesn’t mean that you can’t get them back. When you are trying to rekindle relationships you lost after being diagnosed, traditional means of communication work better than email, text or social networking. Here are a few strategies that can help rebuild those relationships.
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Relationship Tips for multiple sclerosis

By: Matt CavalloFrom cards to chocolate to flowers and jewelry, we exchange gifts as a way to profess our love. We are taught this in elementary school and the tradition grows and changes as we get older and our adult relationships evolve. What happens if in the evolution of a relationship, you or your partner is diagnosed with a devastating disease like multiple sclerosis? All of a sudden the conversations change, the relationship evolves in a different direction. Here are three tips that will improve, rekindle or help the start the conversation to strengthen your relationships with MS.
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Charting key to MS patient advocacy

By: Stephanie ButlerMost of us are not in a hospital or facility where all of our information is kept in one place. We bounce from specialist to specialist, between multiple offices and medical centers. Our chart doesn’t follow us everywhere we go. Instead, we have several charts in several different offices, each one only containing part of our story. Wouldn’t it be nice if your chart could follow you everywhere to avoid those situations? Well mine does, and yours can too.
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Five common symptoms of MS and how to cope

By: Daryl BryantLiving with MS means understanding symptom outbreaks and being able to explain the disease and its symptoms to outsiders. If you suffer from MS or know someone who does, here are tips on how you can cope with and explain common symptoms of MS.
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5 Ways to Make the Most of the New Year with MS

By: Matt CavalloWe are a couple of weeks into the New Year and many of us are transitioning from the glow of the holidays back to normal everyday life. What if we could capture the spirit of the holidays and keep it going throughout the entire year? Here are five steps for making the most of the New Year while living with MS.
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5 Steps to Making Your New Year’s Resolutions Stick (This Year)

By: Matt CavalloIf you made a resolution, then you do want to make a change. However, most people know that they want to make a change but don’t know how to implement that change into their lives. The following are five steps to help ensure that your New Year’s Resolutions stick this year.
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Having Children after a Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis: Worry and Wonder

By: Darbi J. Haynes-Lawrence and Adam R. West of Western Kentucky UniversityExamining parents’ decision to have children after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, we first review individual’s own descriptions of their experiences in having children after diagnosis. We then discuss possible community resources to support families in their decisions to have children.
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4 Symptoms Seasonal Affective Disorder and MS have in Common

By: Matt CavalloLiving with multiple sclerosis is complicated and can be tough to manage on a day-to-day basis. When winter rolls in and the seasons change, living with MS may get more complicated. During this time of year, you may experience an increase in symptoms that may feel like an MS exacerbation, but may actually be seasonal affective disorder. SAD and MS have four symptoms in common.
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5 Tips for Managing Holiday Stress with MS

By: Matt CavalloFor those of us living with MS, this time of year can present challenges outside our normal routine. Keeping up with the pace of the holidays can cause physical, emotional and financial stressors. Stress is the enemy for those of us living with MS. Too much stress can lead to new or worsening symptoms. Managing stress before and during the holidays is critical to feeling good in the New Year.
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10 Proven Tools to Combat Stress and Promote Well-Being

By: Marcia PinckFrom financial worries to family responsibilities, from changes to job status or housing alternatives, Americans are dealing with ever-increasing stress in their lives.
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Stem cell treatments may offer hope for MS patients

By: Dr. Ben ThrowerThe management of MS has advanced rapidly during the past few decades. We have 13 approved treatments for altering the course of MS. We have no approved options for progressive forms of MS and for many, the current treatment options are not enough to completely stop the course of their MS. Could stem cells be the magic bullet we are looking for?
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8 Questions to Help You Evaluate Health News Online

By: Gay FalkowskiThanks to the Internet, the latest news about MS spreads quickly. Because anyone can publish on the World Wide Web, readers should be cautious. Many online health resources are useful, but others may present information that is inaccurate or misleading, so it’s important to find sources you can trust.
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But do you really understand?

By: Betty GibsonOkay,multiple sclerosis is your diagnosis, and a part of your life. You are doing everything you can to fight it, to continue to be happy and productive. You have a care partner (my husband refers to himself as an aggravator!) who understands your altered needs whether minor or major. Is this really true? Do people really understand?
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6 Tips for Parenting with MS

By: Shelley Peterman SchwarzI was a terrific parent before I had children. I had all the answers. My children would not have temper tantrums in the grocery store. My children would follow all the rules. In truth, being a parent has been the most humbling experience of my life. They say insanity is inherited; you get it from your children.
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13 Tactics to Beat the Heat

By: Gay FalkowskiInstead of keeping the AC cranked down low to cope with the summer heat, try making some easy adjustments and adaptations at home to keep your surroundings and yourself as cool as can be.
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5 Forums to Keep MS Awareness in the Spotlight

By: Gay FalkowskiJust because MS Awareness Month is over, don’t stop speaking out for the MS cause. Keep painting the world orange. There are five easy-access awareness tools and ideas that anyone can use.
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Fifteen Ways to be Fearless in the Face of MS

By: Gay FalkowskiBeing fearless can be challenging for those affected by MS, especially right after diagnosis. The experts agree, you don’t always have to be brave. But when the time is right, conquering your fears can be empowering.
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8 Resources That Can Make You a Better MS Advocate

By: Gay FalkowskiMS awareness is so important when it comes to generating support for changes that need to happen — politically, economically, and socially — to improve quality of life for people living with MS. Our call to action during Awareness Month involves asking everyone in the MS community to learn more about how to be a better advocate for the MS cause. The following websites (and one newsletter) can help.
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6 Non-Sexual Intimacy Boosters

By: Gay FalkowskiWhile asking your doctor to treat sexual problems related to MS is important, it’s also helpful to know there are steps you can take outside of the bedroom or the doctor’s office to increase intimacy between you and your loved one.
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6 Fun and Easy-to-Keep New Year’s Resolutions

By: Gay FalkowskiMaking resolutions for the New Year is as traditional as making a champagne toast at midnight—but usually a lot less fun.
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3 General Apps for MS Patients

By: Joanne FortunatoSome of the many issues that MS patients face is organizing important information and networking with others that face the challenges of MS. There are several apps for both Android and Apple that will help with these concerns.
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10 Ways to Keep Joy Alive in the Holidays

By: Gay FalkowskiDuring the holidays, “to-do” lists grow longer and demands on our time and energy seem never-ending. For those with MS, this time of year is especially challenging. Give yourself the gift of a stress-free holiday by following this helpful advice from MS experts and fellow MSers.
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